Multitasking Virus in Our Classrooms

A few weeks ago, I returned to the classroom of Dennis Dalton, the most important college professor of my life. From the back of an amphitheater seating several hundred students, I realized how much things had evolved at Columbia and Barnard. The lecture hall was now equipped with a wireless sound system, webcams, […]

Should Living Paycheck To Paycheck Be A Crime Punishable By Death In Floodwater?

“It’s their own fault, really. Why didn’t those people just evacuate when they had the chance?” I overheard one woman saying to another in the line at the grocery store. I shielded my face with a box of frozen waffles and pretended to read the National Enquirer while I eavesdropped some more.

[…]

Bush, Cheney and the Energy Tsars

In a way, the tragic events of 9/11 played right into the Administration’s hand.

Although Bush’s presidency was only in its seventh month, he was something of a lame duck when the twin towers fell. He had no clear mandate from the American people. In November, he’d lost the popular vote, and had only garnered […]

The Ghost of Elections Past

Los Angeles, summer of ’72: a crowd of anti-establishment types gathered outside of the Wilshire Boulevard offices of CREEP, the Committee to Re-Elect the President, to hear Jane Fonda speak on the upcoming election. Mainly, this was pretty much a garden variety event for that era; “Nixon sucks,” “end the war now,” and “legalize pot” […]

The Ghost of Saigon

Thirty years after the fact, Vietnam is still an open wound. If you listen to the pundits on conservative talk radio, you might come to the conclusion that it’s only those who served in ‘Nam, or those who supported the war, who continue to be bothered over our collective adventure in Southeast Asia. Nothing could […]